Sunday, January 5, 2014

INFRASTRUCTURE & SOCIETAL COLLAPSE: More Plane Crashes - Jet Crashes On Landing At Aspen, Colorado Airport; Killing 1!

January 05, 2014 - UNITED STATES - A small plane crashed while trying to land at the Aspen, Colorado, airport Sunday, killing the co-pilot and injuring two others aboard, said Alex Burchetta with the Pitkin County Sheriff's Office.


Emergency crews respond to the scene of a small plane that crashed upon landing at the Aspen-Pitkin
County Airport in Aspen, Colorado, on Sunday, January 5.


Witnesses described a fiery scene as the plane flipped over and became engulfed in flames.

Photos showed the plane upside down on the tarmac, its fuselage charred.

The pilot of the twin-engine jet earlier reported high winds during a previous attempt to land, according to a recording of the air traffic control radio transmission obtained by CNN through Flightaware, a flight-tracking website.


WATCH: 1 Dead, 2 Hurt in Aspen Plane Crash.




"Missed approach, N115WF.  33 knots of tail wind," the pilot is heard saying a few minutes before the crash.

The deceased co-pilot was identified by Burchetta as 54-year-old Sergio Carranza Brabata of Mexico. Pitkin County Coroner Dr. J. Steven Ayers listed the preliminary cause of death as blunt force trauma.


The Aspen airport is known as a challenging place for pilots to land because of
the mountains that surround the runway.

The pilot of the twin-engine jet earlier reported high winds during a previous attempt to land,
according to a recording of the air traffic control radio transmission.


The injured -- the pilot and another co-pilot flying as a passenger -- were transported to a local hospital with "moderate to severe injuries" as a result of the impact of the crash, Burchetta said. Aspen Valley Hospital spokeswoman Ginny Dyche told CNN the men would be transferred to another facility in Colorado to receive a higher level of treatment.

The National Transportation Safety Board sent a team of investigators to the scene to begin the crash probe, NTSB spokesman Peter Knudson told CNN Sunday.

Two celebrities, who were at the small airport in the Aspen ski resort area, posted Twitter messages saying they witnessed the crash.

"So sad! Horrible plane crash we just saw happen at the Aspen airport," singer LeAnn Rimes tweeted.

Comedian Kevin Nealon tweeted: "Horrible plane crash here at Aspen airport. Exploded into flames as it was landing. I think it was a private jet. Fire truck and ambulances were on the scene within minutes."

Burchetta said the cause of the crash is under investigation.


Firetrucks and ambulances surround the crash site. The airport tarmac is often filled with private planes
owned or chartered by people who own vacation homes in the mountain resort community.

The crashed jet was a Bombardier Challenger 600 coming from Tucson, Arizona, an FAA spokesman said.


"Right now, we have no indication that there was anything wrong prior to landing," Burchetta said.

FAA spokesman Allen Kenitzer said the Bombardier Challenger 600 that was coming from Tucson, Arizona. The plane originated from Toluca, Mexico, roughly 40 miles west of Mexico City, according to Flightaware.

The Aspen airport is known as a challenging place for pilots to land because of the mountains that surround the runway. The airport tarmac is often filled with private planes owned or chartered by the wealthy and famous who own vacation homes in the mountain resort community.

"Airport is closed now," Nealon tweeted. "I think I'll drive back to LA after seeing that." - CNN.



ICE AGE NOW: Animal Behavior And Disaster Precursors - Unusual Number Of Arctic Snowy Owls Invades The United States, Spotted As Far South As Florida?!

January 05, 2014 - UNITED STATES - Snowy owls have been spotted far south of their usual range in the boreal forest this winter. The birds have been heading south in large numbers, surprising and delighting many bird watchers.


A snowy owl is seen flying in Navan, Ont. (Dave Hiebert / MyNews)


Snowy owls nest in the arctic regions of Canada, Alaska and Eurasia, but are known to head south when their population spikes or their main food source, lemmings, becomes scarce.

Every year a few snowy owls are spotted in a handful of U.S. states, but this year some researchers believe the sightings may reach record numbers. Scientists at The Cornell Lab of Ornithology say irruptions -- when birds migrate beyond their usual range -- for snowy owls occur about every four years. During irruption years the birds have been spotted as far south as Florida, Texas and California.

This winter's irruption has been so dramatic, it's prompted the American Birding Association  to state that the invasion is "getting crazier by the minute."

Sightings of a snowy owl in Florida's Little Talbot Island Park made headlines this week in Jacksonville:





The owls were also spotted in a number of other states including Virginia:





New Hampshire:




Massachusetts:




New York State:




New Jersey:




Michigan:




Pennsylvania:




and Minnesota:




In Canada, there is also an "irruption" – more sightings than usual on country roads and harbours near urbran centres.






- CTV News.